Fort Myers speech therapist

Fort Myers Speech Therapist Insight: What’s a Speech Sound Disorder and How Do You Treat It?

It’s estimated that about one in a dozen kids in the U.S. between the ages of 3 and 17 has some type of disorder related to speech, voice, language or swallowing. Roughly 5 percent have a speech disorder specifically. When we look at even younger kids, it’s about 9 percent. Children who have speech sound disorders struggle to form speech sounds. They have trouble articulating individual sounds, being understood, modulating speech, they might stutter, have a lisp, etc. When it comes to speech sound disorders, working with a skilled, creative pediatric Fort Myers speech therapist can make all the difference.

About Speech Sound Disorders

Kids with speech sound disorders don’t have difficulty understanding language. What they struggle with is expressing language in the sounds of speech at a level that is age-appropriate.

As a Fort Myers speech therapist can explain, speech sound disorders are characterized by regular trouble producing speech sounds. That can mean several different things, including:

  • Phonological problems. This is when one has a tough time producing certain sounds or sound blends.
  • Vocal apparatus problems. This would be if someone has issues with their larynx or lungs that makes producing certain sounds difficult.
  • Speech timing issues. This would be if a child has difficulty with their vowel onset time, vowel duration, consonant closure duration or voicing during consonant closure.
  • Speech difficulty. This would be issues like stuttering or lisping.

Typically, we can classify a speech sound disorder either as a “phonological disorder” or an “articulation disorder.”

Kids often say sounds the wrong way when they’re first learning to talk. This is totally normal. Lots of toddlers can say sounds like w, m or p pretty early on, but struggle to master sounds like th, v or z. The majority of kids can say pretty much all of their speech sounds correctly by the time they’re about 4. If a child is struggling with these sounds beyond 4 or 5, they may have a speech sound disorder.