FOCUS occupational therapists

Some Lee Schools Unveil Sensory Rooms – Why Our FOCUS Occupational Therapists Think More Should

Recently in Fort Myers, Heights Elementary School unveiled a new “sensory room” to provide “brain breaks” for exceptional student education (ESE) pupils. Smaller-scale versions of this are open at two other Lee County schools, according to FOX4. Our FOCUS occupational therapists hope this is just the beginning of a new trend at Lee County Schools – and elementary schools throughout Florida and across the country.

Schools are noisy, busy places overflowing with all kinds of stimuli: Florescent lights, echoing sounds, lots of people in close quarters, lingering cafeteria smells, brightly-colored walls and more. All of this can be quickly overwhelming to children with conditions like autism spectrum disorder or ADHD.

The human brain is designed to produce and regulate responses to our sensory experiences – those we see, touch, taste, hear and smell. “Sensory integration” is how we refer to this link between our brain activity and behavior. For children with certain developmental disorders, the way the brain processes these senses can cause significant discomfort or distress; the brain either overreacts or doesn’t respond adequately. When a child has difficulty regulating their sensory stimuli, it’s called “sensory processing disorder,” which can lead to all sorts of negative behaviors that can be a discomfort to the child and a disruption in the classroom.

Sensory rooms in schools can be a practical solution, providing calming, safe spaces for children with an array of sensory needs. As our FOCUS occupational therapists can explain, a child whose sensory diet is adequately fed will be MUCH better equipped to relax, focus and get down to the actual business of learning.